2019 Reading Goals Check In

When this year started I shared a piece about setting and achieving your reading goals. One of the things I believe is really important to hitting goals is writing them down and checking in on them through out the year.

Since we’re a little more than halfway through the year, I thought I would share my own reading goals progress.

  • Read 100 books – I’ve read 56 books as of today
  • 60% of reading by authors of color – I’m 50% White and 50% authors of color
  • 60% of reading by women or gender queer authors – 55% of my books have been by women or gender non-binary authors
  • 25% of reading by non Black authors of color – of the books I’ve read 18% have been by non Black authors of color.
  • Read 30 books from my unread shelf at the start of 2019 – already ready 23 books from my unread shelf.
  • Read 10 or more books by queer authors – I’ve hit this goal, with 10 books by queer authors.
  • Read at least three books in translation – I’ve only read one book in translation so far this year.

As you can see, I clearly have some categories to catch up in, but overall I’m pretty happy with my progress! How about you? How are you doing with your reading goals in 2019? Share in the comments.


To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. Shopping through these links helps support the show, but does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

Traci on The Feminist Book Club Podcast

I’m so excited to be a guest on The Feminist Book Club podcast. The show is hosted by the lovely Renee Powers, and is devoted to books and features conversations and interviews with feminist authors, writers, and readers.

Today on the show Renee and I are presenting our Top Five Feminist Books! The list isn’t what you’re expecting, but it is a whole lot of fun. We talk about so many amazing books by women, because I can’t be contained to only five. Get your TBRs ready.

Listen Now

Apple Podcasts|The Feminist Book Club Website


The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. Shopping through these links helps support the show, but does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

The Unputdownables: Nonfiction

I have been in a sort of reading slump, and I asked followers on Instagram to help me find a book of nonfiction that is “unputdownable”. The responses were SO good that I figured I would share them with you here and turn unputdownable books into a series on The Stacks website, featuring the most readable books by genre according to you all. Welcome to The Unputdownables.

To start, I’ll share two or three of my picks that fit the category (in this case nonfiction) and then share whatever you all sent my way. If you want to have your pick included in future editions of The Unputdownables make sure you’re following The Stacks on Instagram.

Ok here are my picks for The Unputdownables Nonfiction!

John Krakauer – I recognize this isn’t a book, but every book by John Krakauer is great, and I have read all of his books. They are so engaging and well researched and deep diving. Plus he covers a huge variety of topics from Fundamental Mormons to campus rape culture to Mount Everest. If you haven’t read his books, they are a must. If I had to pick just one, it would be Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman.
Eiger Dreams | Into the Wild | Into Thin Air | Missoula | Under the Banner of Heaven | Where Men Win Glory

Jesus Land by Julia Scheeres – I rave about this memoir all the time and most people don’t know it, but trust me it is amazing. The book is about Scheeres (who is White) and her adopted brothers (who are Black) and their violent and volatile, religious family.

Columbine by Dave Cullen – Another book that I constantly talk about, and for good reason. In this book, Cullen dives deep into the most infamous American school shooting. His research is impeccable and his story telling is out of this world.


Here are a list of books submitted by you all of your favorite unputdownable non fiction titles. If the book came up multiple times I will note that by placing the number times it came up in parenthesis. If I have read the book, I will note that too, by putting the book in bold. The books are in alphabetical order by title. Ok. here is your list of total bingeable true stories as told to me by YOU.

Thats the list for our first ever Unputdownable round up of non fiction. Yo can get any of these books on Amazon or IndieBound. Make sure to share which books you would add to this list in the comments. Stay tuned for the next round of Unputdownables, coming soon.


To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/thestacks). We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of The Stacks.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs in which we receive a small commission when products are purchased through some links on this website. This does not effect opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

The Stacks on The LadyGang Network

Photo:Claire Leahy

I am so thrilled to announce that The Stacks is now part of The LadyGang Network on PodcastOne.

Don’t worry, not much is changing for you. This is just a huge opportunity for The Stacks to reach new audiences and widen our platform. We will continue to have fun and thoughtful conversations about a diverse range of books with our favorite readers. We couldn’t be happier about this news. So, thank you to everyone who has listened to the show, told a friend, written a review, or read along with us. It is because of all of you that The Stacks is where it is now, and ready to join forces with the badass ladies of The LadyGang.

If you’re new around here, welcome. The Stacks is your literary best friend; your virtual book club;  and your one-stop shop for everything books, and it’s hosted by me, Traci Thomas. The two-part chats are new every Wednesday. Part one features a conversation with our guest about their reading habits, books they love, books they hate, books they’re embarrassed they still haven’t read … and so much more! In week two’s episode, my guest and I discuss The Stacks Book Club pick–with titles ranging from hot new releases to forgotten treasures. You can find our book club picks here, and I’ll always let you know if there are spoilers. Plus, every other Monday we have mini episodes, called The Short Stacks, with authors about their process and their books.

You can still get the show where ever you listen and now you can also get the show through PodcastOne’s site.

Thank you all for your support, encouragement, feedback, and wonderful book recommendations. Cheers to more books and more life. See you in The Stacks.


Hear Traci on The LadyGang

I’m so excited to be a guest on The LadyGang podcast. If you’re not familiar with the show it is basically hanging out with your three best gal pals to talk all things from Hollywood gossip to vaginal rejuvenation to dating horror stories and whatever else comes up. Nothing is off limits. The show is hosted by Becca Tobin (past The Stacks guest), Keltie Knight, and Jac Vanek.

This week on the show, I we talk about reading goals, some of our most favorite books, and we do a mini-book club discussion of Tell Me More by Kelly Corrigan (don’t worry, no spoilers). I had a blast with The LadyGang, so go check it out!

Listen Now

Apple Podcasts|The LadyGang Podcast Website


The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. Shopping through these links helps support the show, but does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

Ask the Stacks

I constantly find myself getting asked by family, friends, and listeners, what book should I read? It is one of my favorite questions. I love giving book recommendations and learning about what other people like to read, but my own reading is limited to my tastes and the things I’ve been exposed to. So in order to diversify my recommendations, we’re taking it to podcast.

Starting now, you can email askingthestacks@gmail.com and we’ll reply on air with a book recommendation (or two) from both me, Traci, and my guest. Tell us what you like, what you don’t, what you’re hoping to read more or less of, and we’ll tell you what we think you should check out.

Make sure to include in your email:

  • Your name (and social media handle if you’re so inclined) and where you’re from.
  • What you’re looking for (think: genre, subject, author identity, publication year)
  • What are some books you’ve really enjoyed
  • What are some books that didn’t work for you

We will do the rest!

Want to make sure your email is read on the air? Join The Stacks Pack over on Patreon, and get the perk of having your request bumped to the top of the list.

You can also use askingthestacks@gmail.com to send over questions or topics you’d like us to discuss on the podcast. Questions about your To Be Read list, diversity in publishing, setting up your own book club, or anything else thats on your mind.

Send over your questions to askingthestacks@gmail.com, and lets get to reading.


To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

The Stacks Anniversary Superlatives

Its a little bit hard to even believe that one year ago today the first ever episode of The Stacks aired with our guest Dallas Lopez, and now 365 days later we have 62 episodes out in the world. In that time we have discussed 26 books for the The Stacks Book Club, met 33 different guests, had nine Short Stacks, and talked about countless books. But more than any of that, we’ve connected with so many wonderful bookish friends around the world. It has been my greatest pleasure.

In honor of our first trip around the sun, I wanted to share some of my The Stacks superlatives with all of you. While, I have loved every guest and every conversation, here are a handful that have stood out for me.


Listener’s Favorite
Ep. 20 Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates with Jay Connor

Whenever I ask listeners which episode they like most, the most common answer is Between the World and Me with Jay Connor. Jay is the creator and co-host of The Extraordinary Negroes podcast and hearing him discuss Ta-Nehisi Coates’ book is as engaging as it is revelatory. We talk race, parenting, and Coates’ skill as a writer in this fan favorite.

Literary Hero
Ep. 35 Prodigies, Time Machines, & Beautiful Writing with Aja Gabel
Ep. 36 If You Leave Me by Crystal Hana Kim with Aja Gabel

Some people can just talk about books and make the stories come to life, and Aja Gabel is one of those people. The author of The Ensemble came to talk with us about her reading life, and playing the cello, and having a PhD. Then she blew our minds in her thoughtful and insightful reflections of If You Leave Me by Crystal Hana Kim, and it was a dream. Aja is so smart and creative and her understanding of writing and story telling added a true depth to this conversation.

Most Unlikely Pairing
Ep. 22 The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner with Becca Tobin

Becca Tobin is best known for her work on the LadyGang Podcast and playing Kitty Wilde on Glee, and while most people wouldn’t think that she’d even be on a book podcast, here she is talking about women in prison with us as we break down The Mars Room. Here at The Stacks, we like a surprise. Don’t worry she still brings her signature sass and sense of humor, which you can hear even more on her first episode where she talks about life in Hollywood.

Best Laugh
Ep. 9 Talking Book with Vella Lovell

Sometimes you just want to talk books with your gal pals, and this episdoe with Vella Lovell is just that. You may know Vella from Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, but I know her from our days acting in college, and we have blast talking theatre and Shakespeare. It is a great time.

Best Scammer
Ep. 27 Talking Investigative Journalism with Nancy Rommelmann
Ep. 28 Bad Blood by John Carreyrou with Nancy Rommelmann

I don’t like to brag, but it must be said, The Stacks was ahead of the curve when it came to Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos. We were talking about America’s favorite scammer back in August with author and journalist Nancy Rommelmann (To The Bridge). Not only did Nancy break down Bad Blood, the book all about the Theranos scandal, she also talks about her own experiences with serial killers and psychopaths. Both of Nancy’s episodes will excite the true crime lover in you. By the way, if you love Nancy, you should also check out our episode where we break down her book, To The Bridge with journalist Heather John Fogarty.

Most Charming
The Short Stacks 1: Crystal Hana Kim//If You Leave Me

Our first guest for The Short Stacks was author Crystal Hana Kim, and holy cow is she a delightful human. She has the best energy and loves Earl Grey tea as much as I do. Plus, Crystal is a force on the page, her bookIf You Leave Me, is a stunner. The writing is gorgeous and flowing and leaves you gutted. After you listen tell me you don’t want to be BFFs with this badass author.

Book I Want Everyone to Read
The Short Stacks 8: Lacy M. Johnson//The Reckonings

If there is one book I can not stop raving about, it is The Reckonings by Lacy M. Johnson. This collection of essays is powerful and creative and necessary and took my completely by surprise. In order to complete my life’s mission, to get this book in all of your hands, I invited Lacy on the show for one of our Short Stack episodes and she did not disappoint, she was as interesting and smart in conversation as she is on the page.

Person You Most Want to Get a Drink With
Ep. 41 Comedy, Race, Travel, & Books with Tawny Newsome

Tawny Newsome is the best. She is smart, funny, cool, gorgeous, and is the kind of person you just want to be around. Lucky for all of us, we got her on tape, and we can listen to her over and over (and we do). Tawny is a co-host of Yo, Is This Racist? podcast and an actress, and she talks with us about what its like to be the race police, her love of travel and appreciations for lady comedians. But the truth is what makes this episode is just Tawny being Tawny.

Most #BlackGirlMagic
Ep. 33 Book Girl Magic with Renée Hicks
Ep. 34 The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison with Renée Hicks

On her 24 hour stint in Los Angeles, we got to meet up with Renèe Hicks aka Book Girl Magic to talk books and it was, well, magical. Renèe shares her own, relatively recent, journey into reading and about her book club which centers the work of Black women authors. Then for The Stacks Book Club we talk about the great Toni Morrison’s debut, The Bluest Eye. Two truly special episodes with a truly special woman.

Best Book Breakdown
Ep. 48 Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah with Wade Allain-Marcus

Actor and writer Wade Allain-Marcus joined the podcast to discuss perhaps our most challenging read, Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah. Friday Black is collection of short stories that deal with race and class, gender and capitalism. The book is so smart and layered a ton of it went over my head, and that’s where Wade stepped in to give his insightful analysis. I don’t know what we would have done without him. He gave me, and many listeners a new understanding of Friday Black. It is also worth noting, author Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah joined us for The Short Stacks to share his own perspectives on this award winning and thought provoking book.

Most Sentimental
Ep. 1 Talking Books with Dallas Lopez

You can’t have a year anniversary if you never get started, and so this superlative goes to the first ever episode with our guest, and my friend, Dallas Lopez. Dallas, a high school English teacher, joined the show before I ever knew what the show was, and helped shape The Stacks. I would be lost without his ability to talk about books.


I would love to hear what books or episodes stick out for you. Share in the comments below. This list is making me want to go back and listen to every single episode of the podcast. Thank you again and again for being a part of this show and this community. Without all of you, there is no The Stacks.


To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/thestacks). We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of The Stacks.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs in which we receive a small commission when products are purchased through some links on this website. This does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

The Stacks Anniversary Giveaway and Book Drive

To celebrate one year of The Stacks on #bookstagram, I wanted to do a giveaway for you, and a book drive for those in need of some good reading.

I have picked two organizations, Prisoners Literature Project and The Free Black Women’s Library Los Angeles.

To enter the giveaway here is what you need to do:

  1. Follow @thestackspod on Instagram
  2. Donate a book through these links: PLP Wishlist or FBWL-LA Wishlist
  3. Comment with the title of the book you donated
  4. Share your receipt in your Instagram stories and tag @thestackspod. If your account is private please DM @thestackspod.
  5. Every book you donate is an entry.

It is super simple, will make you feel good, and you’re entered to win:

  1. A copy of Parkland by Dave Cullen– one of The Stacks most anticipated reads of 2019
  2. A copy of the new UK edition (with new forward) of Columbine by Dave Cullen as gifted by the author.
  3. A book of your choosing by a Black author– in honor of Black History Month
  4. The Stacks Tote Bag
  5. The Stacks Bookmarks

So head over to The Stacks Instagram page and enter.


Giveaway closes February 21, 2019 at 11:59pm PST. Must be at least 18 years of age. Not affiliated with any organizations, publishers, authors, or websites.

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/thestacks). We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of The Stacks.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs in which we receive a small commission when products are purchased through some links on this website. This does not effect opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

A Guide to Reading More and Achieving Your Reading Goals in 2019

I hear from so many people that they wish they read more. I think that no matter how much you read, you feel like you could be reading more, or reading better, or reading smarter, or reading more diverse, or reading more of what you already own. With so much amazing stuff to read in the world, it can feel like there is always more you could be reading.

Here is a little guide I’ve put together for how to make reading more a part of your life. This will really help if you’ve lost touch with reading and need to get back on track. I come back to many of these when I find myself in a reading slump throughout the year.

  • Set Clear Goals– Make sure your goal is quantifiable. Saying you want to “read more” is easy, but would you really be happy if you read one book more than last year? If yes, great! If not, what do you really mean? If you know you want to read 24 books, say that. Or say I want to read two books a month. Its important you get very clear on your goals so that you know when you’re achieving them.
  • Write Them Down– If you have a goal written down you’re more likely to achieve it. Journal, notes app, post-it, whatever it is, write it down.
  • Tell a Friend– I told my husband when I was planning on reading 12 books in a year. This way, he knew what I was up to when I opted for my book instead of TV time. It also held me accountable, and cheered me on. When I hit the goal we toasted with a little sparkling wine!
  • Pick Up Books You REALLY Want to Read– This is especially true if you’ve never been a big reader, or you just haven’t been that into it. Pick books that excite you, and ones you think you’ll love. If they’re not as good as you thought, put them down. Move on.
  • Put Books Down– Life is too short. Its ok. Not every book is for you. The next one might be the best book you ever read, but you won’t know that if you keep reading the book you’re not that into.
  • Keep a List of Books You Want to Read– I love Goodreads. Its a website that tracks the books I’ve read, want to read, and that I’m currently reading. Its free, and has a social component (if you’re into that friend me), plus you can write rate and review each book as you go. At the end of the year, they send you your reading year in review which is honestly, the best.
  • Create Your Reading Space-Find a place you like to read, and make it your reading spot. For starters (if you have the room) make reading the only thing you do in that space, weather it be a chair or a hammock or a corner of the couch. Get a snuggly blanket, a bright, but not-too harsh light, and a little side table. Now you’ve got a reading nook. Go there to read. Train your body to know that when you’re there, you read.
  • Schedule Reading Time– Decide how often you want to read and plug it in your calendar. Or you can commit to read reading 20 minutes each day. Either way get regular about your reading.
  • Prepare to Read– Make your tea, grab your snack, turn on (or off) your music, go to the bathroom. Make sure you’re ready to fully focus on your book before you get comfortable in your nook. You want to have eliminated all potential distractions so this can be reading time.
  • Get in the Zone (and off your phone)– Seriously. When its time for me to read, I turn my phone on airplane and/or Do Not Disturb mode. I set a timer, and I read. When the timer goes off, I give myself a chore to do, go on a walk, or get on with my day. But I treat my reading time with the same focus and respect I would any other task. Also, the timer will go off and wake me up if I’ve fallen asleep reading (which happens often, my reading set up is very comfy).
  • Talk to Your Reading Friends– Identify people in your life (or on #bookstagram) whose reading aligns with yours, and ask them for suggestions on what to read. They will not only help you find great books, but then you’ll have someone to talk to about all your reading. Its like a book club without the hassle. You can also read along with The Stacks Book Club and enjoy our TSBC episodes where we talk in depth about each book.
  • Track Your Progress– This allows you to know where you are in the process. Goodreads will do this for you too. In addition to Goodreads, I also have an excel spread sheet, where I enter all the books I’ve read, where I got the book, when they were published, the ethnicity of the author, their gender, and more. I also keep a note on my phone with all the books and page counts for the year, month by month. I’m intense, and I love to track things. You don’t have to be like me. But keeping track some way will help you stay focused through the year.
  • Celebrate Your Wins– If you notice you’re on track to hit your goal, celebrate that. Maybe buy a new book, or get a new mug. Maybe you just do a happy dance, or brag to your friend who you told about your goal. Or post about what you’re reading on your social media. However you do it, make sure you feel good about the reading you’re doing.
  • Have a Plan if You Fall Behind– If you look up and your reading isn’t going according to plan, change course. Can you update your goal for the last half of the year? Could you make up for lost time? How about add in some shorter books of poetry or a YA book to get you back on track? Don’t be afraid to modify your goals if you need to.
  • Don’t be Hard on Yourself-If you look up and you realize you’re not hitting your goals thats totally OK. Just reading is doing something good, and enjoy the time you spend with your books. The worst thing you can do is get frustrated and give up.
  • If All Else Fails, Read– Don’t complicate things, pick up your book and start reading, you’ve got this.

I hope that lists helps you get ready to read more in 2019.

Since I think I’ll need a little help achieving my own reading goals in 2019, I’ll share them all with you now.

  • Read 100 Books
  • At least 60% of my reading needs to be books by authors of color
  • At least 60% of my reading needs to be books by women or gender queer authors
  • At least 25% of my reading needs to be by non Black authors of color
  • Read at least 30 books that I already own at the start of 2019–I currently have 136 unread books in my house (#unreadshelfproject2019, #babygotbacklist)
  • Read at least 10 books by queer authors
  • Read at least three books in translation

Here are some other reading goals (many came from you all) not so much focused on overall quantity, and some tips to achieve them.
While the below goals are very general, I suggest you get specific with your own goals and write them down.

  • Read more books by women, or women of color, of queer authors, or any other specific demographic of author.
    • Tip: Pick a number of books, or a percentage of your reading you’re aiming for, and keep track as you go along. This way you’ll see your progress and be inspired by that.
  • Read better books.
    • Tip: figure out what “better” means to you, then follow people, authors, and publications that promote what you want to be reading. Also ask your friends (who you trust their reading taste) if they have other books like this. You might be shocked what books they come up with.
  • Read more nonfiction.
    • Tip: Follow me. I promise I have lots of nonfiction recommendations for you. Also, check out this past post about great nonfiction for fiction lovers, that I put together. Also check out our sponsor My Mentor Book Club for a nonfiction book subscription box (plus you get 50% your first month).
  • Be OK with not finishing a book.
    • Tip: Figure out what is making you not OK with putting a book down. You feel like you’ve wasted your time, you don’t know if you get credit for having read the book if you stop, you’re worried you might like it later on. Once you get to the root of the problem, you can solve it and start leaving books unfinished.
  • Read more books by independent publishers.
    • Tip: Make a list of the independent publishers you know and like, and start going to their site to find whats coming out soon, and check out their catalogs of backlisted books.
  • Read more of what you own.
    • Tip: Set a book budget and stick to it (either number of books or dollar amount). You can also alternate books you own with new books, or switch off monthly between new and owned.
  • Read more classics and backlist books (or any genre).
    • Tip: Set a minimum of what you want to read each month from this category. This way you can read a classic and still leave yourself room for whatever else you like to read.
  • Read the catalogue of an author, Year of Morrison anyone?
    • Tip: Make a plan and write it down. Decide if you’re reading chronologically or by mood, then plot how often you need to be reading books by your author and schedule it. I read a Shakespeare play a month for my #ShakeTheStacks Challenge and always know that Shakespeare is a part of my monthly TBR pile.

This is just a handful of goals and tips to achieve them. Lean on your book loving friends and family to hold you accountable and make sure you share your wins! I know 2019 is your year of reading. You got this.


To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. Shopping through these links helps support the show, but does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

My 10 Favorite Reads of 2018

First let me say, 2018 was an amazing reading year for me. I read more books than I’ve ever read in a single year. I finished 88 books. I also kept track of everything I read, partially because I love a good spread sheet, and partially to hold myself accountable.

Before I dive into my top 10 books, here is a little breakdown of what I read in 2018.

  • 44/89 books were by authors of color (49%)
  • 48/89 books were by women (54%)
  • 26/89 books were by women of color (29%)
  • 30/89 books were published in 2018 (34%)
  • 60/89 books were acquired by me in 2018 (67%)
  • 50/89 books were nonfiction (56%)

Of all the books I read here is how the star ratings shook out

  • 16/88 books received five stars (18%)
  • 25/88 books received four stars (28%)
  • 31/88 books received three stars (35%)
  • 11/88 books received two stars (13%)
  • 3/88 books received one star (3%)

I love a good stat, and I could break down my reading even more, but I won’t. Instead here are my top 10 favorite reads of 2018 (in alphabetical order), though they weren’t all published this year.


Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou

The true story of biotech company, Theranos its founder Elizabeth Holmes, and the scam they ran on the rest of the world. This book has it all, fraud, threats, billions of dollars, high profile characters, and a cute blonde. If you need a WTF kind of book, Bad Blood is your best bet.
Hear our full discussion of Bad Blood with Nancy Rommelmann on The Stacks, Episode 28 .


The Girl Who Smiled Beads: A Story of War and What Comes After by Clemantine Wamariya and Elizabeth Weil

A unique memoir, of women refugees, set during the Rwandan Genocide that follows Wamariya and her sister Claire as they travel through Africa looking for a way out. Poetic, and with a sense of calm, this book engages with the trauma that was endured and the perspective that it brought.


Heavy: An American Memoir by Kiese Laymon

An emotional memoir of life as a young Black man in Jackson, Mississippi. Laymon is brutally honest and completely vulnerable as he tells of his own struggles and successes, and he connects his life with a much bigger picture of being Black in America. Laymon’s dedication to the written word and to the power of revision is striking.


Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

A beautiful work of fiction and a modern day retelling of Antigone set against the backdrop of ISIS in Great Britain. This book is an emotional ride with plenty of plot to keep things moving, but still a real strong commitment to developed and complex characters. This book asks the question “who is the bad guy”?
Stay tuned for our conversation of Home Fire on The Stacks Book Club in January.


Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward

The story of Ward’s early years told through the deaths of five young Black men in her life over the course of four years. This book is a Black Lives Matter memoir, before we ever had the language of the movement. Ward crafts a story of pain, grief, womanhood, and Blackness, all with in her signature beautiful writing.
Hear The Stacks discussion of Men We Reaped on episode 4, with guest Sarah Fong.


Othello by William Shakespeare

I revisited this play in anticipation of our episode on New Boy by Tracy Chevalier, and was blown away by how good it is. Othello holds up. This is story of racism, jealousy, entitlement, and sexism. Aside from the language the play, it easily could have been written today. There are scenes in Othello where I found my self in tears simply reading the words. I know Shakespeare is intimidating but I found this to be more accessible than I thought, and it was the spark for my #ShakeTheStacks Challenge.


The Reckonings by Lacy M. Johnson

A collection of beautifully written and incredibly thought provoking essays on justice, revenge, mercy, and responsibility. These essays discuss the most complex and challenging topics of the current moment, from Whiteness to the environment, from terrorism to rape culture. Though they seem like they shouldn’t be placed next to each other, yet it works perfectly. Johnson is a force when it comes to the written word. A true artist, asking questions and leaving room for her reader to find the answers.


Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

If you want to learn about racism and racist ideas and the history of those traditions in America, this is your book. Kendi writes accessibly and in great detail about the power struggle between racists and anti-racists and those in between (assimilationists). He chronicles racist thinking in American life and doesn’t let racism off the hook as simply being ignorant. I still find myself thinking about this book as I watch the world unfold around me.


There There by Tommy Orange

A fantastic novel centered around a big powwow in Oakland, CA. This book is told from many perspectives, and has a cast of dynamic characters. Orange does an amazing job of sharing some of the experiences of urban Native American life, without being preachy or leaning into cliches. The writing is great and the characters are diverse and engaging, plus the plot is suspenseful and keeps you tuned in until the very end.


Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar by Cheryl Strayed

I never thought I would love an advice book so much, but Tiny Beautiful Things is more than just advice. Strayed is the perfect mix of compassionate and curt. She tells it like it is, and weaves her own stories into her sage words. Sometimes she delivers a warm embrace, sometimes she takes you down a peg, but mostly she does both, and it is perfect. I know this is the kind of book I will return to when I just want someone to tell me about myself.


Thats all from me, but please share your favorite books you read in 2018 in the comments below, and I look forward to reading more great books with all of you in 2019.


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