Ep. 126 Sula by Toni Morrison — The Stacks Book Club (Brit Bennett)

Brit Bennett (The Vanishing Half, The Mothers) is back for our annual discussion of a Toni Morrison novel. This year, we’re taking on Sula, Morrison’s novel about the bonds between women. Our conversation dives into feminist commentary throughout the book, the desire to create lasting communal art, and the ways Morrison uses gruesome violence and unexpected humor to show us a world that is deeply human and uniquely Black.
There are spoilers in this episode.

LISTEN NOW

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | PodcastOne | Google | Android

Everything we talk about on today’s episode can be found below in the show notes. You can also find everything we talked about on Amazon.

Connect with Brit: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Website

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Apple Podcasts |The Stacks on PodcastOne | Goodreads | Patreon

Support The Stacks

Get your copy of Saving Ruby King by Catherine Adel West wherever books are sold.

Libro.FM – get three audiobooks for the price of one when you use code THESTACKS at checkout.

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.


The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.

Ep. 123 Complication and Imagination with Brit Bennett

Our guest today is Brit Bennett, author of The Mothers, and her latest book, an instant New York Times #1 Bestseller, The Vanishing Half. Brit shares what it has been like having her book optioned by HBO, publishing in the middle of a pandemic and civil rights movement, and how she balances research and creativity. We also talk about the books that Brit loves and the types of characters that excite her.

The Stacks Book Club selection for August is Sula by Toni Morrison, we will discuss the book with Brit Bennett on August 26th.

LISTEN NOW

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | PodcastOne | Google | Android

Everything we talk about on today’s episode can be found below in the show notes. You can also find everything we talked about on Amazon.

Books

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 44EDE00B-5AD4-4C5A-9D4C-7828C1FF0E6F-F1575D6A-0FB7-4AC7-BB2B-4ED83C5F2C34-683x1024.jpg

Everything Else

Connect with Brit: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Website

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Apple Podcasts |The Stacks on PodcastOne | Goodreads | Patreon

Support The Stacks

Get your copy of Saving Ruby King by Catherine Adel West wherever books are sold.

Libro.FM – get three audiobooks for the price of one when you use code THESTACKS at checkout.

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.


The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.

Ep. 108 Priya Parker on Meaningful Gatherings in the Time of Corona

Priya Parker, the author of The Art of Gathering: How We Meet and Why it Matters, is helping us take a deeper look at how we can create collective meaning in modern life, one gathering at a time. Not only do we discuss Priya’s amazing book, but we also talk about connecting with purpose when we cannot be physically together. She shares insight into her new podcast Together Apart which, is about gatherings in the time of Coronavirus. Then we look ahead to how we will gather after COVID-19.

Remember, The Stacks Book Club selection for April is Trust Exercise by Susan Choi, we will discuss the book with Brandon Taylor on April 29th.

LISTEN NOW

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | PodcastOne | Google | Android

Everything we talk about on today’s episode can be found below in the show notes. You can also find everything we talked about on Amazon.

Connect with Priya: Twitter | Instagram | Website |Together Apart Podcast

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Apple Podcasts |The Stacks on PodcastOne | Goodreads | Patreon

Support The Stacks

Libro.FM – get three audiobooks for the price of one when you use code THESTACKS at checkout. The Stacks Libro.FM Playlist.

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.


The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.

EP. 105 The Union of Science and Art with Brandon Taylor

Today marks the start of our third year here at The Stacks, and there is no better way to celebrate than by talking a whole lot about books! Thank you to all our listeners for their love and support, we can’t wait for year three! Make sure to listen to the introduction today to hear about some exciting changes to the podcast.

Our Guest today is Brandon Taylor, debut author of one of 2020’s buzziest books, Real Life. We talk today about releasing a book into the world, the similarities between science and art, and much more.

The Stacks Book Club selection for April is Trust Exercise by Susan Choi, we will discuss the book with Brandon Taylor on April 29th.

LISTEN NOW

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | PodcastOne | Google | Android

Everything we talk about on today’s episode can be found below in the show notes. If you’d like to support your local indie, you can shop through IndieBound.

Books

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 86869476-D399-4D3F-A110-F2D4269E5225.jpg

Everything Else

Connect with Brandon: Twitter | Instagram | Website

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Apple Podcasts |The Stacks on PodcastOne | Goodreads | Patreon

Support The Stacks

Libro.FM – get three audiobooks for the price of one when you use code THESTACKS at checkout.

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.


The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.

Ep. 104 So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson — The Stacks Book Club (Gigi Levangie)

Today for The Stacks Book Club, we are talking cancel culture and social media as we examine Jon Ronson’s book, So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed. Back to discuss this book with us is author (Been There, Married That) and screenwriter, Gigi Levangie. We ask questions about consent, power dynamics, and fame and how these elements play into public shamings.
There are no spoilers in this episode.

LISTEN NOW

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | PodcastOne | Google | Android

Everything we talk about on today’s episode can be found below in the show notes. If you’d like to support your local indie, you can shop through IndieBound.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 211A38A6-5DA6-4619-BEDC-4F905E661328.jpg

Connect with Gigi: Instagram | Twitter | Website

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Apple Podcasts |The Stacks on PodcastOne | Goodreads | Patreon

Support The Stacks

Audible– to get your FREE audiobook download and FREE 30 day trial go to audibletrial.com/thestacks.

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.


The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.

The Stacks Book Club — March 2020

Enough with new releases, we’re doing a little backlist action this March. Not just backlist, but nonfiction backlist. Don’t get intimidated, get excited!

On March 11th, we’re reading a classic by Audre Lorde, Sister Outsider. This book is a collection of essays and speeches positioned at the intersection of race and class, gender and sexuality. The book was originally published in 1984, and stands the test of time, speaking to issues what we are still grappling with today.

Then we’re reading So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson on March 25th. This book from 2015 examines the earliest days of this new age of public shaming on social media, a phenomenon we’ve now come to know as “cancel culture”. The book looks at the process of shaming and how it works.

As always, we want to hear from you, so please reach out with your thoughts, questions, and things you want to hear discussed on the podcast. You can email us at thestackswithtraci@gmail.com, comment on this post, or reach out through Instagram @thestackspod.

Order your copies of our February books on Amazon or IndieBound:


To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/thestacks). We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of The Stacks.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.

My 10 Favorite Reads of 2019

Putting together a list of favorite reads is always so fun and so tough for me. I read over 100 books this year, so narrowing it all down is a great way to reflect on what I learned and how I’ve changed in the last 365 days.

I did keep track of everything I read. Mostly because I’m a huge nerd and love a good spreadsheet, but also because I like to stay accountable to my reading goals.

Before I dive into my top 10 books, here is a little breakdown of what I read in 2018. I read a total of 101 books, exactly ONE book over my goal.

  • 49 were by authors of color (49%)
  • 54 books were by women (54%)
  • 31 books were by women of color (31%)
  • 40 books were published in 2019 (40%)
  • 62 books were acquired by me in 2019 (62%)
  • 61 books were nonfiction (61%)

Of the 101 books I read here is how the star ratings shook out

  • 17 books received five stars (17%)
  • 23 books received four stars (23%)
  • 45 books received three stars (45%)
  • 14 books received two stars (14%)
  • 2 books received one star (2%)

I love a good stat, and I could break down my reading even more, but I won’t. Instead here are my top 10 favorite reads of 2019 (in alphabetical order), though they weren’t all published this year.


Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson (2016)

The story of August, a twelve year old Black girl navigating a new life in Brooklyn. She moves north, with her father and brother, after her mother’s death. It’s the story of August growing up, finding new friends, and creating space her own space in the world.

This is one of the best coming of age stories I’ve ever read. The characters as vibrant and live in the space of confidence and insecurity that is so common for teenagers. She understands what it means to be lost and then found. She captures so much in this book, and does it all in less than 200 pages. That kind of brevity is rare, and a sign of true mastery.

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (1987)

In the story of her life, Assata Shakur lets her reader in on her childhood, her relationship with the Black Liberation Movement, and her arrest and imprisonment. The prose are conversational and the content is enraging and devastating. Not only is this book a look back at the past, it is also a very clear indictment on the current state of affairs in The United States.

I loved that Shakur wasn’t presenting an objective history, but rather a deeply personal and emotionally charged retelling of her life. You can feel her passion and her rage in every sentence, and it is beautiful.


How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi

The books is part memoir and part guide to identifying and combatting racist ideas in ourselves and in our culture. Kendi’s main premise is that there is no such thing as a “not racist” person, instead there are only racists thoughts and actions, and antiracist thoughts and actions, and these two things can live simultaneously in any human, even Kendi himself.

This was one of my most anticipated books for 2019, and it did not disappoint. Kendi is able to make combatting racism approachable. Most Americans can read this book and find ways to reflect on their own contributions to racism and their own role in changing the system. I also loved getting to see a more personal side of Kendi, a man I admire greatly.


How We Fight for Our Lives by Saeed Jones

A stunning memoir about finding ones self at the intersection of sexuality and race. Saeed Jones shares his coming of age and his questioning of his identity and belonging and it is incredible to read. Jones’ use of prose and poetry is effortless and serves the story and creates a piece that is as enjoyable to read as it is painful.

I learned a lot about the ways we get in the way of young queer people’s, especially of color, exploration of their identities. In How We Fight for Our Lives I was able to understand the types of violence both physical and emotional, that often accompany the shame and fear about living as one’s true self. I loved this book. Saeed Jones is a force.


Look Both Ways by Jason Reynolds

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 51s2kRh7iOL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

A collection of short stories of middle school kids walking home from school. The stories are all unique and individual, but they intersect with the other stories in one way or another. It is a beautiful book about the few minutes a day kids are left unsupervised and get to experience the world on their own.

This book was the biggest surprise for me this year. Admittedly middle grade short stories isn’t a genre I’d think I’d like, and yet here we are. Something that Jason Reynolds is able to do with Look Both Ways is see the humanity in his characters. These kids have all had experiences that have shaped them, some more traumatic than others, but he finds a way to present this without making the kids into their trauma. The characters are full of life and joy and they are impossible to forget. Its also worth noting, Reynolds can write!


Lot by Bryan Washington

A collection of short stories about Black and Brown life in a neighborhood in Houston, told all in the first person with differing narrators, this book is a work of creativity and true craft. Unlike most short story collections where there is no sense of progress or growth over time, in Lot, Washington uses one family as our anchor and we get to watch as their lives unfold through alternating stories. That is supplemented with a cast of characters from the”lot” and their lives.

Washington’s perspective on life and sex and family and gentrification are subtle and smart and really beautiful. The stories are small and intimate. He centers queerness and cultural homophobia in a way that is honest and not preachy. Some standout stories for me were “Lot”, “Waugh”, and “Congress”, but I would say each story enhances the next.

Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I’m Learning to Say by Kelly Corrigan

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 51oEv7qO4rL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

A collection of essays on things that are difficult to say. This book is not what it seems. Corrigan wrote Tell Me More after the passing of her father and dear friend, Lisa. The book ends up being more a response to the loss of her loved ones, an understanding of her own grief, and way to help her (and the reader) move on when things feel devastating.

I loved this book. I got so much out of it and wept openly in sections. While the grief is ever present through out, there are also conversations about knowing your own worth, finding ways to be truly empathetic, and seeking out true love and joy that were valuable.


The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 41cFc108RGL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Historical fiction at its best. The Nickel Boys is inspired by a real life nightmare of a reform school, and follows two fictional characters who grapple with the horrors they experience, the friendships they create, and the prejudice they face as young Black men in Jim Crow Florida.

Colson Whitehead is a professional writer of the finest caliber. He is exacting and precise. There is not a word wasted in this book. You get to know the characters and feel for them deeply. The way this story unfolds is near perfection.


The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11 by Garrett M. Graff

A beautifully told oral history of the events of September 11, 2001 as told by the people who lived the day. The accounts range from employees who went to work in the World Trade Center to the Vice President tucked away in a bunker, to a mother who gave birth on that fateful day, to worried family members whose loved ones were aboard hijacked planes. This book encapsulates the emotions and voices of a nation in fear, and without any answers.

What this book does best is connect the reader to the anxiety of that day. It is an extremely emotional book and there were times in my reading where I could feel my heart rate quicken as I turned each page. More than any event this book is about the feelings. We all know what happened that day, but this book will live on as a document of what it felt like to live through this historic event.


Thick: And Other Essays by Tressie McMillan Cottom

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 31xu90fbaVL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

A collection of essays that are at once smart, funny, and truly thought provoking. Cottom is one of the most critical and nuanced thinkers on race and gender, and she centers the experience of Black women consistently in her work. Thick is effortless in its ability to move between ideas of intersectionality, the art of “the turn” is perfected in these pages.

I loved how I felt challenged in reading this book. I didn’t always understand what Cottom was saying on the first read, and was forced to go back and grapple with the work. I applaud Cottom for not making her work small to accommodate her reader. Her writing is too important for that. Go read Thick. You will learn things, you will connect dots you never knew you could. It is powerful and empowering.


To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/thestacks). We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of The Stacks.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.

Ep. 90 Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson — The Stacks Book Club (Jason Reynolds)

Jason Reynolds is back this week for The Stacks Book Club discussion of Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson. The novel tells the story of three generations of one family in Brooklyn, NY and the struggles and successes of life. We talk about the taboo of not loving motherhood, doubling down on disappointment, and sensitivity readers.
There are spoilers this week.

LISTEN NOW

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | PodcastOne | Google | Android

Everything we talk about on today’s episode can be found below in the show notes. If you’d like to support your local indie, you can shop through IndieBound.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_5974.jpg

Connect with Jason: Twitter | Instagram | Website

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook |Apple Podcasts |The Stacks on PodcastOne | Goodreads | Patreon

Support The Stacks

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

Audible– to get your FREE audiobook download and FREE 30 day trial go to audibletrial.com/thestacks.


The Stacks received Red at the Bone from the publisher. For more information click here.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.

The Short Stacks 28: Jacqueline Woodson//Red at the Bone

We are thrilled to have best selling novelist and poet Jacqueline Woodson on The Short Stacks to discuss Red at the Bone, her newest book, and our book club pick for this week (tune in on Wednesday)! We talk with Jacqueline about how she turned a childhood habit of lying into a career, crafting authentic characters, and giving a TED Talk.
There are no spoilers on this episode.

LISTEN NOW

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | PodcastOne | Google | Android

Everything we talk about on today’s episode can be found below in the show notes. If you’d like to support your local indie, you can shop through IndieBound.

Connect with Jacqueline: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Website

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook |Apple Podcasts |The Stacks on PodcastOne | Goodreads | Patreon

Support The Stacks

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

Audible– to get your FREE audiobook download and FREE 30 day trial go to audibletrial.com/thestacks.


The Stacks received Red at the Bone from the publisher. For more information click here.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.

The Stacks Book Club — December 2019

For the month of December we’re reading two books, by two phenomenal women. One is a work of nonfiction that centers stories of immigrant children, the other a multigenerational family story of Black life in American.

First up, on December 4th we’re reading Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions by Valeria Luiselli is a confrontation between what we call “The American Dream” and the reality of coming to America for undocumented children. The book is short and packs a powerful punch.

Red at the Bone is Jacqueline Woodson’s newest release. It is the story of generations of one Black family as they navigate the everyday joys and trauma of life. A subtle story about being alive and the people and decisions thats make us who we are. We’ll be discussing Red at the Bone on the podcast on December 18th.

As always, we want to hear from you, so please reach out with your thoughts, questions, and things you want to hear discussed on the podcast. You can email us at thestackswithtraci@gmail.com, comment on this post, or reach out through Instagram @thestackspod.

Order your copies of our August books on Amazon or IndieBound:


To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/thestacks). We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of The Stacks.

The Stacks received a copy of Red at the Bone from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. For more information click here.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. This in no way effects opinions on books and products reviewed here. For more information click here.