The Short Stacks 15: Akiba Solomon & Kenrya Rankin//How We Fight White Supremacy

For the first time ever we have two authors on The Stacks at once, and we are thrilled about it. Today we talk to Akiba Solomon and Kenrya Rankin the co-authors of How We Fight White Supremacy: A Field Guide to Black Resistance. We discuss the importance of diverse Black voices being represented in the book, how Solomon and Rankin worked together to create it, and the importance of a book proposal. Plus we talk about how small acts of resistance have a big place in the fight against white supremacy.
There are no spoilers on this episode.

LISTEN NOW

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | PodcastOne | Google | Android

Everything we talk about on today’s episode can be found below in the show notes. If you’d like to support your local independent bookstore, you can shop through IndieBound.

Connect with Akiba: Twitter | Instagram | Website
Connect with Kenrya: Twitter | Instagram | Website

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook |Apple Podcasts |The Stacks on PodcastOne | Goodreads | Patreon

Support The Stacks

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

Audible– to get your FREE audiobook download and FREE 30 day trial go to audibletrial.com/thestacks.


The Stacks received How We Fight White Supremacy: A Field Guide to Black Resistance from the publisher. For more information click here.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. Shopping through these links helps support the show, but does not effect opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

Ep. 63 For the Love of Therapy with Lori Gottlieb

Today on the podcast we have therapist and New York Times Best Selling author Lori Gottlieb. We talk with Lori about her newest book Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed, about the value of therapy and mental health, and how her book took shape. Then we dive into Lori’s reading habits, which can be summed up by her catch phrase, ABAB aka Always Bring a Book. Plus you can win a copy of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone, details on The Stacks Instagram page (giveaway ends June 18th).

LISTEN NOW

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | PodcastOne | Google | Android

Everything we talk about on today’s episode can be found below in the show notes. If you’d like to support your local indie, you can shop through IndieBound.

Books

Everything Else

Connect with Lori: Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook |Apple Podcasts |The Stacks on PodcastOne | Goodreads | Patreon

Support The Stacks

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

Audible– to get your FREE audiobook download and FREE 30 day trial go to audibletrial.com/thestacks.


The Stacks received Maybe You Should Talk to Someone from the publisher. For more information click here.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs. We receive a small commission when products are purchased through links on this website, and this comes at no cost to you. Shopping through these links helps support the show, but does not effect opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare

The Two Gentlemen of Verona is one of Shakespeare earliest comedies, and was the February read for the #ShakeTheStacks Challenge. It is the story of Proteus and Valentine, two young men who are best friends and in love with two different women, Julia and Silvia. As the play goes on, things change, mostly Proteus, and the whole thing goes off the rails. There is crossdressing, a dog, some rebels, love songs, and banishments. Its a whole thing.

This play is not a great read, it is much better on stage. A lot of the humor is physical, revolving around Launce and his dog, Crab. Not to mention Proteus’ change in a allegiance makes most sense when its seen, on the page it feels manic and unfounded.

The women in this play are fiercely loyal and committed to their own happiness. They both are able to express their free will in a way that many women characters are not, even in today’s literature, especially that written by men. Both Julia and Silvia get to be a little mean, which I love. Sure, they’re also a little spoiled, but their hearts are in the right place.

The ending of the play has left scholars stumped/in debate with each other for centuries. The pay off of the complicated and morally troubling ending is really something. Seeing the play (and having been in it, as Silvia), and how each actor plays the ending is really what makes the ending so confounding.

The writing to The Two Gentlemen of Verona is very straight forward, and if you’re new to Shakespeare’s plays it is a great pick. Otherwise, I might not suggest this one. It doesn’t have a ton to say that doesn’t get said better in other plays like A Midsummers Night Dream or As You Like It. The Two Gentlemen of Verona feels like a place that Shakespeare started exploring themes like, loyalty in conflict with love, women dressing up like men, and love triangles gone wrong.

Next month for #ShakeTheStacks Challenge, I’ll be reading Love’s Labour’s Lost.


To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/thestacks). We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of The Stacks.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs in which we receive a small commission when products are purchased through some links on this website. This does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

The Stacks Tote Giveaway

We’re giving away three of our brand new The Stacks tote bags. All you have to do to enter is become a member of The Stacks Pack, aka contribute to The Stacks on Patreon.

IMG_7626

Patreon is a website that allows for artists to reach out to their communities for financial support in exchange for access and perks for their patrons. Here at The Stacks we offer perks ranging from social media shout outs to helping us pick our upcoming book club books, from adding questions to the questionnaire we give every guests to now, a chance at winning our awesome new tote!

To enter, all you have to do is go to www.patreon.com/thestacks and contribute what you can. Once you do that, you’re entered to win. We will pick three winners on August 16, 2018. Its that simple.

Thank you as always for your support of The Stacks. It means more than you could know.

Ep. 15 Talking Unconventional Women with Lauren Fanella

cropped-TheStacks_logo_final.jpgThis week our guest is Lauren Fanella, Lauren is a book reader and reviewer on #bookstagram, you might know her as @literarylauren_. Lauren is a lover of books by and about unconventional women, she reads for joy, and she’s not scared of a big sad book. We talk about Lauren’s reading habits, what books she’s looking forward to reading, and how books help her to see the world differently.

Here are links to all the things we dicsussed this week on the show.

BOOKS

EVERYTHING ELSE

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram|Facebook|Twitter|Goodreads|Traci’s Instagram|iTunes|The Stacks Website|Patreon

Connect with Lauren: Instagram|Goodreads

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

Thank you to this week’s sponsor Audible. To get your FREE audiobook download and FREE 30 day trial go to audibletrial.com/thestacks.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs in which we receive a small commission when products are purchased through some links on this website. This does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here

 

Ep. 13 Writing Your Book with Ross Asdourian

cropped-TheStacks_logo_final.jpgWe’re excited to welcome Ross Asdourian to our show this week. Ross is the debut author of a hilarious memoir, Broken Bananah: Life, Love, and Sex…Without a Penisthe story of that one time he broke his penis. We don’t just talk about Ross’ unmentionables, we also talk about the process of writing your own book, self-publishing, and more. Of course Ross is also answering all of your favorite The Stacks questions.

You can find a list of all the things we discuss this week right here.

BOOKS

EVERYTHING ELSE

 

Connect with The Stacks: Instagram|Facebook|Twitter|Goodreads|Traci’s Instagram|iTunes|The Stacks Website|Patreon

Connect with Ross: Instagram|Broken Bananah Website|Broken Bananah Facebook

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

Thank you to this week’s sponsor Audible. To get your FREE audiobook download and FREE 30 day trial go to audibletrial.com/thestacks.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs in which we receive a small commission when products are purchased through some links on this website. This does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here

 

Ep. 12 How Soccer Explains the World by Franklin Foer — The Stacks Book Club (Aaron Dolores)

cropped-TheStacks_logo_final.jpgThis week Aaron Dolores, founder of Black Arrow FC is back and we’re discussing How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization by Franklin Foer. This book takes a look at the world’s most popular sport, and how changes in the social and political landscapes are mirrored on the pitch. With The World Cup in full swing, we discuss racism in soccer, we hypothesize as to why Americans aren’t that into the sport, and we encourage you to pick a team and start rooting.

There are no spoilers this week. We are more focused on contextualizing the socio-political climate in soccer today, and how that relates to the book.

Here is a list of all the things we discuss on this week’s episode.

Connect with The Stacks: InstagramFacebook | TwitterGoodreads |iTunes| The Stacks Website|Traci’s Instagram

Connect with Aaron & Black Arrow FC: Black Arrow Website | Black Arrow Instagram | Black Arrow Facebook | Black Arrow Twitter |Aaron’s Instagram

To contribute to The Stacks, join The Stacks Pack, and get exclusive perks, check out our Patreon page. We are beyond grateful for anything you’re able to give to support the production of this show. If you prefer to do a one time contribution go to paypal.me/thestackspod.

Thank you to this week’s sponsor Audible. To get your FREE audiobook download and FREE 30 day trial go to audibletrial.com/thestacks.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs in which we receive a small commission when products are purchased through some links on this website. This does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here

The Shakespeare Challenge — #ShakeTheStacks

EF56F06F-1235-4BBF-ACDD-4FF5EBA340BFLast month I read Othello for the first time in years. I read it to refresh myself on the story in order to discuss Tracy Chevalier’s adaptation New Boy. I was a little nervous to go back to reading Shakespeare, it had been years since I had opened a play by The Bard, despite having studied his work extensively in college. I was shocked at how enjoyable it was, and how rich the text is. The work felt relevant and touches on issues we’re currently discussing as a society. I hadn’t realized how much I had missed his plays, and how exciting it was to read them again.

So I decided that I’m going to commit to reading one Shakespeare play a month for the next 36 months (since I already read Othello). Some of them will be re-reads for me, and there are about 12 I’ve never read. I think it’ll be fun, plus then I can say, I’ve read every Shakespeare play. Who doesn’t love a little literary bragging. Its a long term goal,  and I won’t be done until 2021, which I also like.

I’m calling this challenge #ShakeTheStacks and I would love to have company on this journey weather you want to read the full 37, or just read the handful that are on your list.

I know folks can be intimidated by Shakespeare, myself included. So here are my suggestions on how to make reading Shakespeare a successful endeavor.

  1. Relax. The stuff is complex and thats what makes it everlasting. So if you miss something or don’t quite understand it, thats OK. Keep going, Shakespeare’s characters repeat themselves a lot.
  2. Play the part. These are plays, which means they’re meant to be heard aloud. If you get stuck, try saying the words out loud.
  3. Get into the groove. The verse is written in iambic pentameter, and it is there to help you. Allow yourself to fall into rhythm when you’re reading. Thats Shakespeare’s way of guiding you through, and keeping you on track.
  4. Get good notes. Try to find translations that have notes that make sense to you. I love the Pelican Shakespeare. The notes help but aren’t so long they get in the way.
  5. Read the ending first. Well not actually, but if you do better when you know the plot, go ahead and read a synopsis, so you can really indulge in the language and poetry instead of sifting for clues. Generally if the play is a comedy it will end in a wedding and the tragedies end in death.
  6. Trust yourself. You’re not dumb, and you do understand it. Take the pressure off. Think about how many times you’ve seen a play or movie and missed something, or gotten confused as to what was going on. It happens to us all the time. Don’t let the idea of Shakespeare freak you out.
  7. Enjoy. The whole point is to read something and enjoy it. If you’re not into the play move on. Or better yet, watch a the movie, or listen to a staged reading. Find a way to enjoy the Bard, this isn’t punishment.

Now I just have to figure out which order to read these plays. Do I got with chronological? Alphabetical? By genre? Or mood read? What do you think?

If you’re joining me make sure to tag any posts with #ShakeTheStacks, this way we can keep track of all our Shakespearian progress.

The Stacks participates in affiliate programs in which we receive a small commission when products are purchased through some links on this website. This does not effect my opinions on books and products. For more information click here.

 

WELCOME

Hi All!

My name is Traci and I run The Stacks. We’re a book podcast and blog focused on giving you real life conversations about all things book.

The Stacks Podcast is the book club you’ve been waiting for. Each month we’ll pick a book, and then get to talking. Not just about the book itself, but also about what the book means in the greater picture of life and culture. Get ready for conversations that are relatable, thoughtful, funny, and maybe even a little messy.

The Stacks will also be a place to find book reviews, recommendations, listicles, and other bookish thoughts in addition to The Stacks Book Club pick of the month.

I’m a newbie to the book (and blog) community, but I have a passion for good books and hot takes. This should be fun.